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, the civil war and the civil rights era, which brings this nuanced exploration into the 20th century. as we approach the sesquicentennial of the proclamation, wait brings to light how american writers brought their own perspectives to bear on the centennial of the war. how they grapple with the issues it raised unhealthy influence public number and commemoration of the word to varying degrees. the four writers from the southern novelist and essayist, robert penn warren to recant his view of the civil war is a lost cause midwestern historian bruce cotton causes her to norman rockwell come in part because his capacious works on the civil war were widely read at the middle of the century. northern utes in literary critic, edmund wilson looked at the war in terms of its own pacifism, often neglect in the role of race in it in the northern negro novelist james baldwin who is the most acute essayist and tinker in the american psyche hands down working at that time. blight said that all four, and i quote, are geared to say with america's tendency towards a progressive tribal sunny sense of history
they are at a disadvantage, i completely agree with kleiza rice that the civil rights issue of our day is school choice and the disaster of the public schools, it is a universal law of nature that everything run by the government will become worse and more expensive over time. everything that is sold on the private market will become better and less expensive over time. like flat screen tv's, cell phones. versus the post office, public schools, and amtrak food service. and by the way, our entire health care is now going to be put in the hands -- in the capable hands of the federal government. >> one more school thing. also from "the new york times." >> i disagree. >> you may not. four decades after clashes, bottom of the again debates school busing. nearly four decades after the city was convulsed by violence over court-ordered segregation, boston is working to reduce its reliance on busing at a school system now made up of largely minority students. although court-ordered busing ended more than two decades ago, only 13% of students in boston, 13% in the public schools, today are white. and the school
against violence and rape, for equal pay and educational opportunities. on behalf of civil rights and women's rights. we've shown a bright light on women's rights from the powerful economic interest that profit at women's expense to the relishes fundamentalist. in the fall issue of "ms.," we celebrate these 40 years of impactful reporting. from the very first issue, with the abortion petition signed by 53 prominent women who had abortions when they were illegal to repeal our abortion laws. nearly 15 years before anita hill's fame mouse testimony. to our ground beaking reporting that defined genital mutilation as an international crime against women. to our 1996 look inside the taliban's regime before most of the media had even noticed right up to our 2011 story declaring rape is rape in which we revealed the f.b.i.'s 80-year-old definition of rape under counted rapes in this country by hundreds of thousands every year. that was part of a larger feminist campaign and kicked off a fire storm resulting in 140,000 e-mails and letters to the f.b.i. and attorney general demanding the de
of republicans pushing civil rights legislation, antipole tax legislation, anti-link legislation. public accommodations legislation with the democrats constantly blocking, blocking, blocking and the tricks they use these were liberal democrats. they weren't conservative democrats. you just become so frustrated that i think nixon was absolutely right. you can hear the frustration in the speeches he gave about it he said the building trades have been given long enough to -- to -- to voluntarily integrate their work forces. if they're going -- i've had it now. if they refuse to hire black people, we're going to get results now. so i supported it back then i think he was right. >> let me just add one other person's thought on affirmative action and get your response and then we'll start taking calls. this is a piece in the "new york times" this morning by a gentleman by the name of thomas eppenshade. no longer separate equal race in college, an elite college admission and college life he's the professor in [ indiscernible ] he believes affirmative action is beneficial but doesn't believe the
come from? >> guest: well, my first political involvement was in the civil rights movement, where i came along at a time when if you were young and idealistic and in the south, that was--you pretty much were drawn to that. c-span: but what got you interested in that? what--what kind of a--what was the home like? >> guest: my family is quite conservative. my father is, i would say, extremely conservative. i--it was--it--it--it... c-span: is he alive? >> guest: yes, he is. my mama, bless her heart, passed on. i sometimes think it may have been my mother's fault. my mother tried--she--she was certainly, i assure you without success, to drill good manners into my head. and in some ways i think that manners are just a formal expression of how you treat people. and in--the way black people were treated before the civil rights movement, it was clear to me, was very wrong. it was an easy call. c-span: were they political conservatives, ideological conservatives, your parents? >> guest: yeah. both republicans, lifelong. c-span: you write a column about your mom. it's the last thing in the bo
important civil rights cases to come before them in years. affirmative action for college admissions. we are going to break that down and much more after this. >>> former model olga created. she knows contents sells. she also launched a companion online magazine as an opening source important what's in. for more of "your business," sunday mornings, 7:30 on msnbc. i'm only in my 60's... i've got a nice long life ahead. big plans. so when i found out medicare doesn't pay all my medical expenses, i got a medicare supplement insurance plan. [ male announcer ] if you're eligible for medicare, you may know it only covers about 80% of your part b medical expenses. the rest is up to you. call and find out about an aarp medicare supplement insurance plan, insured by unitedhealthcare insurance company. like all standardized medicare supplement plans, it could save you thousands in out-of-pocket costs. call now to request your free decision guide. i've been with my doctor for 12 years. now i know i'll be able to stick with him. you'll be able to visit any doctor or hospital that accepts medicare pa
to ut. >> reporter: conservative groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambitiono major in science and engineering. >> almost a decade ago, then justice sandra day o'connor wrote a majority opinion that said that the university of michigan law school had a compelling interest in promoting class diversity and suggested affirmative action might still be needed for another 25 years. o'connor has since left the court, leading to speculation that the court's conservatives could now strike a blow to preferences. joe johns, cnn, washington. >> thank you, joe johns. so jeff toobin, this is the question. does this texas case raise any new and diinctive questions about this, about affirmative action, or is this one of those second bites at the apple, merely another opportunity for a different supreme court with brand-new justices
of civil rights, when first elected, he was one of the nation's youngest legislators. his son was also a delicate and is now a radio host here at wbal. >> i celebrate the great live that my father lived. the story he presented to all of us who are beneficiaries of his public policy initiative. >> his nephew says his uncle was a man like no other. he taught him about politics. >> he taught us what it meant to campaign, let's just say. he taught us how to knock on doors. he taught us to be close to people peeping he taught us about organization. you cannot just go out there and put your name on the ballot and expect people to votes. he said you always have to stay close to the people. he was the consummate politician and the consummate campaigner. >> but there were hard times. he served 16 months in federal prison after being convicted in 1987 of influence peddling. >> he had a smile on his face. he was just stronger. you know, they are not going to beat me down. he refused to let people beat him down. and even up into his passing, he was fighting. i saw him last week. >> no one's life i
, okay he has the polls. today is a big day for many latinos and many civil rights and labor activists. the fact he dedicates this national monument on a day like today and the fact yes, we can can came from the united workers is a big deal, and it's a message to the latino community. >> each family has their own individuali issues. each person has factors that determine how engaged they are in the campaign, whether they can get out to vote and who they will vote for. generically speaking here, if you had to explain why there's this enthusiasm gap, if these numbers are accurate, what is the problem? >> i think you can look at it from what the gop has not done. i was speaking to a political scientist today who said in some states like nevada and colorado, the anti-immigrant rhetoric hurt in a year that they could have had more latino votes. the economy is not doing that well. >> i get when you look at arizona, why someone would be concerned and perhaps not support a jan brewer, given her actions in front of the mike and behind in her office when she signs legislation. i'm talking about
groups say it's not just about getting in. the u.s. civil rights commission says studies show that using racial preferences can hurt minorities by starting them out near the bottom of their classes. >> if they're towards the bottom of whatever class they go to, they are much more likely to give up on an ambition to major in science and engineering. >> joe johns is live outside of the supreme court for us. so joe, will this decision -- it probably will -- have implications on all college campuses? >> reporter: well, it certainly could. and you know, i have to say, this is such a hotly contested issue even now, and it has been over the years. just that last statement from the commissioner is disputed, you know. the academic mismatch, as it's called, is disputed among people on the other side who say it's unsound science. so just about every single point you look at across the board on the issue of affirmative action and preferences is disputed here in this courtroom right now. what does it come down to? perhaps a very even split. and we do know that justice elena kagan has recused herself.
interfaith and civil rights groups have reached out to metro. >> to ask the transit authority to respond in a positive way, not by censoring, but by working with the arab american and muslim community, promoting mutual understanding, perhaps through another ad campaign that would counter the hate message in this campaign. >> metro officials don't give away ad space anywhere, but if care or any other group wants to counter this message with one of their own and a space becomes available, they are free to do it. they have to pay for the ad. >> and where in my message does it say muslim? >> but cares hooper says it is certainly implied. >> if she wants to spew hatred, she is free to do so in america, but it's up to the rest of the society, the mainstream practitioners to come together to repudiate hatred and promote mutual understanding. >> those posters did not go public without a fight. metro wanted to hold off, but the ads had to go up now. it was concerned about public safety and adding fuel to the fires burning recently. so far, reaction here has been muted. brian. >> bob tonig
and the other members of the eu have suspended habeas corpus, which have limited civil rights and human rights, which have participated in renditions and handing over european citizens to be tortured and other parts of the world or to be sent to guantanamo. so all of this brings very hollow. as for the absurd remark that the european union has united europe after the war? that is total nonsense. it did not exist after the war. were actually helped western europe, not eastern europe, which helped western europe after the second world war and had nothing to do with europe. it was the u.s., the marshall plan which allows money to build part of western europe as part of their contribution compared to the east, which was under soviet control. so why bring me eu in after the war? [indiscernible] to keep europe under some kind of control, and it is not working. european citizens in different parts of europe will be laughing at this decision. >> tariq ali, thank you for being with us, a british- pakistani political commentator, historian, activist, filmmaker, novelist, author of over 20 books includin
, whether it's rights for hispanics and immigrants, whether it's civil rights, those things are on the line. and i just hope we don't see a repeat in the debate tomorrow night of the shame of that first debate where hispanics is and women and gay people and african-americans didn't even seem to exist in domestic policy. >> so, this is irreversible damage, for suburban women. would you agree with that, terry? >> oh, absolutely. i think suburban women are going -- are not going to vote for mitt romney. i think they see right through his deception. and i think that they actually, it's incredibly offensive and demeaning to women to treat us as if we're so stupid that we would believe this kind of hoaxerism. we're looking for a president that we can take at his word. barack obama is pro-choice and he means it when he says he's pro-choice. mitt romney will say anything and do anything and he is not the right president for women. >> i think all of us in our lifetime come across people who do business deals and they will say anything they possibly can to get the deal, close the deal at closing, and
. >> affirmative action, civil rights group rally as the supreme court revisit also race can be a factor in college admissions. and won't you be my neighbor? late night's jimmy fallon visits mr. romney's neighborhood. >> it's a beautiful day in the neighborhood. beautiful day for a neighbor. would you be mine? could you be mine? hello, neighbor. you see this? it's called a wallet. inside of a wallet, oh, that's where money goes. now, do you know what money is? i'm guessing no, because you're watching public television. >> good day. i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the house republican hearings on last month's terrorist attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi are under way now on capitol hill. chairman darrell issa opened the hearings demanding answers from the state department about their response to the incident. as well as the amount of security personnel in place before september 11th. >> we know that the tragedy in benghazi ended as it did. we now know that, in fact, it was caused by a terrorist attack that wasp reasonably predictable to eventually happen somewhere in the world, especia
strong. right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war the army expanded to. 3-million people. 2 and a half people or so in the north. and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts. treason behavior and so on. he didn't pursue every case. he didn't serve on every case himself. obviously a lot of court marshall went on the field. it was his responsibility to make sure that justice was -- as much as he could that justice was prevailing in the cases and punishment was being weeded out as it should be and people's rights were being protected. it was a massive assignment that went way past the end of the war. he stayed in the position until 1875 pfs it a expanded position. he had the role in that that position of making law. so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war the likes of which the the united states had never see. so many, many policy around how the war should be conducted and it needed to be c
: more than 70 groups from civil rights organizations to former military leaders to some of the largest corporations in the country have all asked the court to maintain some use of race in admissions, warning that the loss of diversity would harm business, the training of military leaders, and the quality of education. >> all students would suffer not just black and latino students all students benefit from learning together in the classroom and outside of the classroom. >> reporter: all the courts conservative justices expressed concern over the use of racial prejudice, affirmative action is on the line. the last time the court reviewed this, justice sandra day o'connor speculated race may not be needed after 25 years. >> thanks. in just a few minutes we'll ask texas governor rick perry about the supreme court case right here on cbs "this morning." >> the kacht that italian cruise liner that ran around and capsized has been fired. reports say francesco schettino was let go in july for disregarding company policy. he says the charges are unfound and he wants to be reinstated with back p
, he had his right arm amputated after the civil war. and here is one of him as a father, his grandsons and sons follow them into military service, this is very late in life for him. finally, and ultimately, a group shot that shows him right there, along with all the great men of the time who formed the board for bowdoin college. the chamberlain who also, to civil war service, was shown in this picture. he is right there. so those are the two gentlemen. chamberlain and howard were two years apart. chamberlain was class of 52, howard was class of 50. he did share a dorm, but not a dorm room. so we really don't know too much in the early years about whether they were friendly. certainly, later in life, they were. finally, a picture of howard along with other distinguished alums, including chief justice [inaudible name], next to howard, who is also here at bowdoin. this is a nice, gentle motion of the late 19th century. social life in a small town in maine. this is a letter from christmas morning, 1861, howard at the time was in camp california, which is out of the outset of washington dc.
's 7:17 right now. back to savannah, al and matt. where is the civility? >> our democracy at work. and they are in the same party, right? >> exactly the thriller in manila though. >> exactly. >> you want a piece of this? come on. >> mr. roker, what's going on? >> i'm doing okay. let's see how the rest of us are doing weather-wise. we've got a risk of severe storms stretching from dallas all the way to chicago and minneapolis. threat of damaging winds. look at this. as we head on into tomorrow we're looking at this risk of strong storms. can you see them firing up all the way from minneapolis and back down into texas. rainfall amounts, anywhere from 2 to 4 inches of rain, from oklahoma city all the way up to milwaukee. that's what's going on around s >> and that's your latest weather. savannah? >> thank you. barbra streisand is one of the world's most successful performers entertaining all around the globe and never in her hometown of brooklyn, until now. nbc's mara schiavocampo is live with more. mara, good morning. >> reporter: good morning. last night this place was packed with
strong. you know, right up prior to the war. that's how big the u.s. army was. during the civil war, the army expanded to, you know, 3 million people, two and a half million or so in the north, and this meant that the amount of case work that he had to oversee was extraordinary, and he also was given responsibility for pursuing civilians who were engaged in disloyal acts, treasonnist behavior and so on. although, he didn't pursue every case or serve on every case himself, obviously, a lot of court marshalls on the field and so on, it was his responsibility to make sure as much as he could justice was prevailing in the cases and that punishment was meeted out as it should be and people's rights were protected. it is a massive assignment way past the end of the war. he stayed in that position until 1875 so-dramatically expanded position, and he also had the role in that position of making law, so much law about war didn't even exist because this was a war of the likes which the united states had never seen. to many, many policies around how the war should be conducted and so it needed
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
with add missions policies. as the court has interpreted title vi, the civil rights act of 1964, the private universities have to follow whatever the supreme court says with respect to public universities. and so this is often misunderstood as only affecting public universities. but title vi leverages the effect of this to private universities as well. >> everyone gets affected ultimately. good to see you. thanks for coming in. >> thanks for having me. >>> in our next hour former ohio congressman dennis kucinich joins me live. we're going to talk about cutting entitlements while ensuring the survival of medicare. ase in clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these issues, do you want to walk away or step up? with a degree in the field of counseling or psychology from capella university, you'll have the knowledge to make a difference in the lives of others. let's get started at capella.edu [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] [ laughing ] ♪ >>> welcome to "weekends with
folks lived the civil rights movement. i hope it happens there. at
of the people who affected the civil rights movement, for example, never held elected office. you look at people who were advocates for women's suffrage or a women's right to vote, they were never elected to office. i think it's instilling that motivation in young people, look, this is your opportunity in your forum. you don't have to have a lot of money. you don't have to be famous to build a movement behind an issue you think is important. and waywire is that platform to allow them to do it. this election obviously will be impacted by the young people who show up or don't show up in an election. but i think what's important is you've got to get more people involved in the process and educated. and the other thing that waywire is a much more serious social video platform. it's not just funny youtube videos or clips. it's actually a serious discussion about issues of the day. >> then we definitely are not interested. brian? we like the funny video. >> a lot of focus obviously on the yankees, but i want to talk about a different sport, hockey. you guys build this beautiful arena in newark, it emp
called the meds extreme. in 2009 the court ruled that new haven connecticut violated the civil rights five-year fighters after the results of a promotion exam because not enough blacks had passed. with liberal leaning justice elena kagan reducing herself a key vote could apply again with justice anthony kennedy as we heard from adam. sandy a democrat. what do you think? >> caller: yes. >> host: what do you think of affirmative action in this case specifically for the court? >> caller: well, first of all i would like to hear the make up and see the makeup of the total top ten when she was denied because we so often have not only racial problems, we can have gender problems as well. so before i want to -- before we get into a big hassle about affirmative action and how we as black people or we as white people as a minority, we are not able to have a fair shot in getting into that college and also listening to the case may be they may need to reform. the racial ethnic of the and a graduate student body this is the university of texas, you can see the makeup in 2010, 2007 over 50% white.
sides of the aisle right now. to some degree, that's why we don't get a solution to these important problems. steve, where is the civility that once existed in washington and the spirit of compromise we heard in the 1980s, for example? we keep hearing about the relationship between ronald reagan and tip o'neill and their willingness to compromise, even though they were about as far apart politically as you could get. >> bill, i agree with what you said and what rick said about that. i think it's wrong to say they're honest and they're the way they are because they're not in office anymore. i think what's more correct is they both come from an era where you fought, and you fought hard. but once the vote was taken, you know, they were kind of done. it wasn't really a scorched-earth policy. i grew up in a household where there were many politicians held in high esteem. they were guys like jacob javitz who were held in high esteem. >> reread "alexander hamilton." there's never been civility in politics. >> that comes and goes. that's a cyclical situation. we had a civil war. that was th
mr. obama but then the whole debate he used that civility to mask a total lack of deference. i get the sense he was looking at the president right in the eye for an hour and a half with total disdain. i think the president to his discredit couldn't handle it. he sh you had have looked him in the eye and said, this knit whit, who is he. whatever it takes to stare down a guy who doesn't like you. >> like i'm staring you down. >> no, you do it nicely. there are a couple of things, quite seriously. if i were joe biden, i'm not joe biden, i'd go after a couple of things hard. how does an 82-year-old or 92-year-old man, get on their bicycle, the car, rent a cab, they go out and find an insurance policy to cover them? there's no such insurance company that's going to insure them. this thing about a voucher is fantastic, literally fantastic. secondly, personhood. do you really mean to say that a fertilized human egg, whatever your philosophy or religion, should have the rights of property, should have the rights of liberty? what does that mean except it takes the mother's role and casts it
be a live and silent auction and a civil war encampment. kind of cool. we have a link on our website for tickets. andrea and mike? >> walking the best form of transportation. >> that's right. >>> yesterday we told you the story of gallaudet university's chief diversity officer. dr. angela mccaskill was put on paid administrative leave because she signed a pigs to -- petition to give maryland voters a chance to decide on same-sex marriage. good supporters say miscomes kill cannot be a chief diversity officer without supporting equal rights for all. here's bruce leshan with more. >> reporter: the two people at the heart of the controversy are not talking. the gallaudet university president did send out an e- mail blast to students saying that doctor mccomes skill has participated in a legislative initiative that some feel is inprotect. dr. mccaskill's husband did pick up the money at their upper marlboro home. he said no comment because they're still looking for a lawyer but he did say his wife is so upset about this that she is now under a doctor's care. >> i was quite shocked. >> rep
sending americans to do the job but fewer of them. >> biden: that's right. we are sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to the civil war in syria. 25,000 to 30,000 people have now been killed. president obama explained the military action taken by libya, by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >> biden: it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one-fifth the population that is libya. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war. it would seep into a regional war. you are in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area in the world, and if in fact it blows up and the wrong people gain control it will have impact on the entire region. we are working hand and glove with the turks, the jar dannians, the saudis and all of the people in the region. attempting to identify the people who deserve the help so whe
are already sending americans but fewer of them. >> that's right, we're sending in more afghans to do the job. afghans to do the job. >> let's move to another war, the civil war in syria. where there are estimates that more than 25,000, 30,000 people have now been killed. in march of last year president obama explained the military action taken in libya by saying it was in the national interest to go in and prevent further massacres from occurring there. so why doesn't the same logic apply in syria? >>s it's a different country. it is five times as large geographically. it has one fifth the population that is libya, one fifth the population, five times as large geographically. it's in a part of the world where they are not going to see whatever would come from that war, it has seep mood a regional war. are you in a country that is heavily populated in the midst of the most dangerous area of the world. and, in fact f, in fact t blows up and the wrong people gain control, it's going have impact on the entire region causing potentially regional wars. we are working hand and glove with the turks,
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 55 (some duplicates have been removed)